CFPB Addresses Expiring GSE Patch

Calendar and hourglass. Credit: GettyImages/BrianAJackson

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued two Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRMs) to address the impending expiration of the Government-Sponsored Enterprises Patch (GSE Patch).

Eric C. Peck
 & 
June 23, 2020

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued two Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRMs) to address the impending expiration of the Government-Sponsored Enterprises Patch (GSE Patch). The GSE Patch is scheduled to expire in January 2021 or when the GSEs (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) exit conservatorship, whichever comes first.

The Dodd-Frank Act amended the Truth-in-Lending Act (TILA) to establish ability-to-repay (ATR) requirements for most residential mortgage loans. TILA identifies factors a creditor must consider in making a reasonable and good faith assessment of a consumer’s ATR. TILA also defines a category of loans called qualified mortgages (QMs), which are presumed to comply with the ATR requirements. The Bureau completed an ATR/QM rule that established a general QM standard for loans where the consumer’s debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is 43% or less and the loan meets the other statutory QM requirements.

Read more from the CFPB's release.

This article originally appeared in the National Mortgage Professional print magazine.

Eric C. Peck is senior editor of National Mortgage Professional magazine and editor-in-chief of the National Mortgage Professional Magazine website.

Eric C. Peck is senior editor of National Mortgage Professional magazine and editor-in-chief of the National Mortgage Professional Magazine website.

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CFPB Addresses Expiring GSE Patch
Compliance

CFPB Addresses Expiring GSE Patch

June 23, 2020
by
Eric C. Peck

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued two Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRMs) to address the impending expiration of the Government-Sponsored Enterprises Patch (GSE Patch). The GSE Patch is scheduled to expire in January 2021 or when the GSEs (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) exit conservatorship, whichever comes first.

The Dodd-Frank Act amended the Truth-in-Lending Act (TILA) to establish ability-to-repay (ATR) requirements for most residential mortgage loans. TILA identifies factors a creditor must consider in making a reasonable and good faith assessment of a consumer’s ATR. TILA also defines a category of loans called qualified mortgages (QMs), which are presumed to comply with the ATR requirements. The Bureau completed an ATR/QM rule that established a general QM standard for loans where the consumer’s debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is 43% or less and the loan meets the other statutory QM requirements.

Read more from the CFPB's release.

Written by 
Eric C. Peck

Eric C. Peck is senior editor of National Mortgage Professional magazine and editor-in-chief of the National Mortgage Professional Magazine website.

ericp@ambizmedia.com

These articles are powered by National Mortgage Professional

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued two Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRMs) to address the impending expiration of the Government-Sponsored Enterprises Patch (GSE Patch). The GSE Patch is scheduled to expire in January 2021 or when the GSEs (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) exit conservatorship, whichever comes first.

The Dodd-Frank Act amended the Truth-in-Lending Act (TILA) to establish ability-to-repay (ATR) requirements for most residential mortgage loans. TILA identifies factors a creditor must consider in making a reasonable and good faith assessment of a consumer’s ATR. TILA also defines a category of loans called qualified mortgages (QMs), which are presumed to comply with the ATR requirements. The Bureau completed an ATR/QM rule that established a general QM standard for loans where the consumer’s debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is 43% or less and the loan meets the other statutory QM requirements.

Read more from the CFPB's release.

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